Manoa Falls


Manoa Falls in Oahu, Hawaii is a popular tourist stop. There is good reason too, it is easily the most beautiful waterfall on the island. It has a vertical drop of about 100 feet, with rushing water forming a small shallow pool at the base. However, visitors are prohibited from swimming. The pool is filled with sharp boulders that are not visible from the surface. Violators can face a fine for swimming.

How to get there
There are a lot of tourist sites that charge between $30.00-$60.00, to carry you (by bus) to the falls. However, the directions from Waikiki are very easy, for those with rental car’s. McCully Street will carry you out of Waikiki. Turn right at Kapiolani Blvd. Turn left at The University of Hawaii campus. Turn right at Manoa Road. At the dead end, the trial begins. If any doubts, simply follow the posted roadway signs.

The falls can be accessed by a 1 ½ mile path. It generally takes about an hour to walk. The path is well worn, and is classified as an “easy” difficulty. There are not any steep incline’s and the trail is mostly under tree cover. If you want to see a waterfall, Manoa is one of the most accessible.

What to expect
The trial maybe slippery and muddy in wet weather, or after a rain. So, take caution- especially if you have small children. Tennis shoes or hiking boots should be worn.

Mosquito’s are pretty bad along the trial. Repellent may be a good investment.

DOWNLOAD OUR TRAVEL GUIDES

FOR FREE

 

There are not any food or water stops, and you can not drink the fall water. A snack and water supply is recommended, especially for diabetics and children.

There is a boundary around the pool. The single steel cable will not keep anyone out. It simply serves as a warning to any crossers or swimmers, that they can be cited if they violate the boundaries.

It cost five dollars to park.

The waterfall flows year round into a 15 or 20 ft wide pool. However, there is a tremendous amount of visitor’s, so it may take a while to actually get around the waterfall.

When to go
The trial is maintained by the state and is usually open sunrise to sunset.